2.11.2009

What did we do to Andrew Sullivan?

In 2006, during the war against Hizballah, Andrew Sullivan might as well have been working for the Israeli consulate. Quoting relentlessly from pro-Israel bloggers, vigilantly condemning Reuters doctored photos, and unequivocally identifying Hizballah as the aggressors, we had Andrew on our side. Questions of proportionality did not enter his discourse--at least not that I can remember.

Now, it is true that Israel did not destroy the bunkers and that Hizballah has storehouses full of rockets, but it is also true that the border has been quiet for three years (Kin ahora, pu, pu, pu) and that Hizballah decided to sit this war out.

Now, he raises all the just war issues in Gaza when he knows that once Israel decided to go in, there would be significant civilian casualties. His claim was that this incursion would not have the desired result and would only serve to further radicalize the people of Gaza. How much more they have been radicalized is an open question, given that the propaganda machine was operating against Jews and Israel full blast before the war.

Now, there has been an Israeli election where southern Israel has voted in droves for Avigdor Lieberman, a thug, because they have been radicalized by the rockets of Hamas. The thug's party has eclipsed Barak and Labor as a potential power broker for forming the next coalition government. Where is the outrage regarding the radicalization of the next generation of Israelis who, according to Haaretz columnist, Tom Segev, no longer believe in peace? Why would they? They only believe in ensuring some quiet and order for a few years until the next time. Are they to blame for this unfortunate turn "against peace", or do we offer them the same understanding that we so generously give to the noble citizens of Gaza?

This is disturbing, but all the fancy talk of "just wars" is risible given the present reality.

Andrew, what happened to you? I really thought you knew better.

2 comments:

  1. Hey Rabbi!
    This is especially interesting since the Labor party held such a majority for such a long time, and people for the most part liked Barak as defense minister. A possibility is that if Bibi can convince Tzipi and gang to join him, then Labor will be pressured to also join the coalition. In that case, you can expect major changes to the electoral system.
    Gavi

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  2. Oh, and from now on I'll be using the name thrivinghighschool (my blog's at http://thrivinghighschool.wordpress.com)

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